Inspiring Business by Sharing Success

Amo Raju named in Britain’s top 100 most influential disabled people

Amo Raju named in Britain’s top 100 most influential disabled people

Amo Raju has been named in the Disability Power 100, the list of Britain’s most influential disabled people. 
 
Amo, the chief executive of Disability Direct, the biggest user-led disability group in the Midlands, was recognised for his lifelong work by the Shaw Trust. 

“More recently, Amo hIts judges, chaired by the BBC’s Disability Correspondent Nikki Fox, said: “Amo believes passionately in diverse services delivered by a diverse set of people and has a successful track record of encouraging a culture of opportunity around him.” 
 
“As a disabled person from a BAME background, Amo has often faced twice the discrimination and fought against stereotypical societal expectations and then utilised his experience for the benefit and empowerment of his peers.  
 
“With little to no entrepreneurial experience, Amo has created successful businesses which generate 95% of the income required to run the charity. To date, he has overseen income generation in excess of £25m. 
 
“Previously, a semi-successful Bhangra singer, Amo also broke down barriers for his peers who have an interest in music. His songs are still played regularly across UK radio stations and on the dance floor at social gatherings. 
 
“After 27 years in services, Amo also runs his own consultancy business which supports and mentors tomorrow’s leaders.  
 
“His expertise is now extended to and utilised in the role of PilotLighter for the national charity Pilotlight UK and as an Associate Non-Exec Director for Derbyshire Community Health Services NHS Foundation Trust. as disclosed his life-long battle with depression across his social media platforms in an aim to encourage others to talk to someone about whatever their troubles are. Indeed, a semi-biographical book is in production which charters his journey from a disabled child to his modern-day success.” 
 

Amo said: “To be acknowledged by the Shaw Trust, which has long been a beacon-carrier for disabled people, is very humbling. 
 
“I hope that my success can inspire other disabled people to realise that there are opportunities out there for them – they just need to grab them.” 
 
“Meanwhile, I will continue to fight to ensure as many as possible understand their rights and that organisations across the country respond positively towards them.” 


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